What Jesus says about being Ready

 


Read Matthew 22:1-14

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ovMfn3Wpyk?feature=oembed&w=770&h=433]

The Six Questions:


What about this story/context/verse stands out to me? _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


How is this different from the life I live now? How is this different from the society and culture I’m a part of? (Luke 12:35-40) ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________


How does this passage challenge me? ________________________________________ Are there other verses that speak to my challenge? (Titus 3:1, 1 John 2:28) __________________________________


Where do I see Jesus, or miss Jesus in this passage? (Matthew 24:42-43) ______________________________________________ Are there verses that speak to this elsewhere in the Bible? ___________________________________________________


What am I missing in my life that God wants me to have? (Matthew 24:44) _________________________________________________________________ What other verses are there to support that? _______________________________________________


Is there someone else who could use this in their life? How can I share it? ________________________________________________________________ 

Adrienne Rowe-Saulsbury is an elementary school teacher and crafter who writes from Columbus, Ohio.

 

 


This article is part of our 2022 November/December Issue
Subscribe –>

 

 


Come as You Are… 

Just Don’t Leave that Way

“Then he said to his servants, ‘The wedding is ready, but those who were invited were not worthy. Therefore go into the highways, and as many as you find, invite to the wedding.’ So those servants went out into the highways and gathered together all whom they found, both bad and good. And the wedding hall was filled with guests.

  “But when the king came in to see the guests, he saw a man there who did not have on a wedding garment. So he said to him, ‘Friend, how did you come in here without a wedding garment?’ And he was speechless. Then the king said to the servants, ‘Bind him hand and foot, take him away, and cast him into outer darkness; there will be weeping and gnashing of teeth.’

“For many are called, but few are chosen.”

 Matthew 22:8-14, NKJV*

A Reflection

The Wedding Garment

The man who came to the feast without a wedding garment represents the condition of many in our world today. They profess to be Christians, and lay claim to the blessings and privileges of the gospel; yet they feel no need of a transformation of character. They have never felt true repentance for sin. They do not realize their need of Christ or exercise faith in Him. They have not overcome their hereditary or cultivated tendencies to wrongdoing. Yet they think that they are good enough in themselves, and they rest upon their own merits instead of trusting in Christ. Hearers of the word, they come to the banquet, but they have not put on the robe of Christ’s righteousness.

Many who call themselves Christians are mere human moralists. They have refused the gift which alone could enable them to honor Christ by representing Him to the world. The work of the Holy Spirit is to them a strange work. They are not doers of the word. The heavenly principles that distinguish those who are one with Christ from those who are one with the world have become almost indistinguishable. The professed followers of Christ are no longer a separate and peculiar people. The line of demarcation is indistinct. The people are subordinating themselves to the world, to its practices, its customs, its selfishness. The church has gone over to the world in transgression of the law, when the world should have come over to the church in obedience to the law. Daily the church is being converted to the world.

All these expect to be saved by Christ’s death, while they refuse to live His self-sacrificing life. They extol the riches of free grace, and attempt to cover themselves with an appearance of righteousness, hoping to screen their defects of character; but their efforts will be of no avail in the day of God.

The righteousness of Christ will not cover one cherished sin. A man may be a law-breaker in heart; yet if he commits no outward act of transgression, he may be regarded by the world as possessing great integrity. But God’s law looks into the secrets of the heart. Every act is judged by the motives that prompt it. Only that which is in accord with the principles of God’s law will stand in the judgment.

God is love. He has shown that love in the gift of Christ. When “He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life,” He withheld nothing from His purchased possession. (John 3:16.) He gave all heaven, from which we may draw strength and efficiency, that we be not repulsed or overcome by our great adversary. But the love of God does not lead Him to excuse sin. He did not excuse it in Satan; He did not excuse it in Adam or in Cain; nor will He excuse it in any other of the children of men. He will not connive at our sins or overlook our defects of character. He expects us to overcome in His name.

ELLEN G. WHITE (1827-1915), one of the most published authors in the world, named one of the “100 Most Significant Americans of All Time” by the Smithsonian Institution in 2014, was a co-founder of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

*You can read The Desire of Ages in its entirety online at www.whiteestate.org/onlinebooks.


This article is part of our 2022 November/December Issue
Subscribe –>

 

 

 

 

_________________

*You can read The Desire of Ages in its entirety online at www.whiteestate.org/onlinebooks.





The Healing Touch

 


 

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBuPxS-_o30?feature=oembed&w=770&h=433]

The Seven Questions:


What about this story/context/verse stands out to me? ____________________________________________________________________________________


How is this different from the life I live now? How is this different from the society and culture I’m a part of? (Hebrews 4:16) Any other verses shed light on this? _____________________________________________________________________________


How does this passage challenge me? ________________________________________ Is there a verse that speaks to my challenge? (James 4:2) __________________________________________________


Where do I see Jesus, or miss Jesus in this passage? (John 16:24, John 5:19) Are there verses that speak to this elsewhere in the Bible? ___________________________________________________


What am I missing in my life that God wants me to have? (John 10:10) What other verses are there to support that? _________________________________________________________________________


Is there someone else who could use this in their life? How can I share it? ______________________

Adrienne Rowe-Saulsbury is an elementary school teacher and crafter who writes from Columbus, Ohio.

 

 


This article is part of our 2022 September/October Issue
Subscribe –>

 

 


Your Name on It

“We must go on to other towns as well, and I will preach to them, too. That is why I came.” So he traveled throughout the region of Galilee, preaching in the synagogues and casting out demons. 

“A man with leprosy came and knelt in front of Jesus, begging to be healed. ‘If you are willing, you can heal me and make me clean,’ he said.

“Moved with compassion,[a] Jesus reached out and touched him. ‘I am willing,’ he said. ‘Be healed!’ Instantly the leprosy disappeared, and the man was healed.”

 Mark 1:40-42, (NLT)*

A Reflection

While Others Receive a Blessing, Dare I to Hope?

“Of all diseases known in the East the leprosy was most dreaded. Its incurable and contagious character, and its horrible effect upon its victims, filled the bravest with fear. Among the Jews it was regarded as a judgment on account of sin, and hence was called “the stroke,” “the finger of God.” 

Deep-rooted, ineradicable, deadly, it was looked upon as a symbol of sin. By the ritual law, the leper was pronounced unclean. Like one already dead, he was shut out from the habitations of men. Whatever he touched was unclean. The air was polluted by his breath. One who was suspected of having the disease must present himself to the priests, who were to examine and decide his case. If pronounced a leper, he was isolated from his family, cut off from the congregation of Israel, and was doomed to associate with those only who were similarly afflicted. The law was inflexible in its requirement. Even kings and rulers were not exempt. A monarch who was attacked by this terrible disease must yield up the scepter, and flee from society. …

In the region of Christ’s ministry, there were many of these sufferers, and the news of His work reached them, kindling a gleam of hope. But since the days of Elisha the prophet, such a thing had never been known as the cleansing of one upon whom this disease had fastened. They dared not expect Jesus to do for them what He had never done for any man. There was one, however, in whose heart faith began to spring up. 

Yet the man knew not how to reach Jesus. Debarred as he was from contact with his fellow men, how could he present himself to the Healer?

And he questioned if Christ would heal him. Would He stoop to notice one believed to be suffering under the judgment of God? Would He not, like the Pharisees, and even the physicians, pronounce a curse upon him, and warn him to flee from the haunts of men? 

He thought of all that had been told him of Jesus. Not one who had sought His help had been turned away. The wretched man determined to find the Savior. Though shut out from the cities, it might be that he could cross His path in some byway along the mountain roads, or find Him as He was teaching outside the towns. The difficulties were great, but this was his only hope…

The work of Christ in cleansing the leper from his terrible disease is an illustration of His work in cleansing the soul from sin. The man who came to Jesus was “full of leprosy.” Its deadly poison permeated his whole body. The disciples sought to prevent their Master from touching him; for he who touched a leper became himself unclean. But in laying His hand upon the leper, Jesus received no defilement. His touch imparted life-giving power. The leprosy was cleansed. 

Thus it is with the leprosy of sin,—deep-rooted, deadly, and impossible to be cleansed by human power. “The whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint. From the sole of the foot even unto the head there is no soundness in it; but wounds, and bruises, and putrefying sores” (Isaiah 1:5, 6). But Jesus, coming to dwell in humanity, receives no pollution. His presence has healing virtue for the sinner. Whoever will fall at His feet, saying in faith, “Lord, if Thou wilt, Thou canst make me clean,” shall hear the answer, “I will; be thou made clean” (Matthew 8:2, 3, R. V.).  

ELLEN G. WHITE (1827-1915), one of the most published authors in the world, named one of the “100 Most Significant Americans of All Time” by the Smithsonian Institution in 2014, was a co-founder of the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

*You can read The Desire of Ages in its entirety online at www.whiteestate.org/onlinebooks.


This article is part of our 2022 September/October Issue
Subscribe –>

 

 

_________________

*You can read The Desire of Ages in its entirety online at www.whiteestate.org/onlinebooks.